Woman in forest

A huge area of temperate rainforest, sand dunes and coastal heathland with strong links to the Tasmanian Aboriginal people

The Tarkine Forest Reserve, while not a national park, is a huge area of temperate rainforest, sand dunes and coastal heathland with strong links to the Tasmanian Aboriginal people. The area contains a wildly diverse landscape including Australia's largest patch of temperate rainforest and a world of natural treasures including mountain ranges, wild river and cave systems, buttongrass moorlands, and a rugged coastline with long sandy beaches, grassy woodland and coastal heath.

The Tarkine Reserve joins the 100,000 hectare Arthur Pieman Conservation Area, itself containing a wealth of natural wonders and Aboriginal sites of great archaeological significance. Evidence of the lives of past Aboriginal communities can be seen in the many shell middens, hut depression sites, artifacts and rock engravings - and today's Tasmanian Aborigines still have powerful connections to this place.

Waterways can be explored by canoe, kayak and riverboat cruises through forests of blackwood, myrtle and celery top pine all the way to the sea. There are numerous walking trails from Arthur River and the nearby South Arthur Forest drive, including the Celery Top pine nature trail and the Balfour Track rainforest walk.

Image: Exploring the Tarkine / Credit: Pete Harmsen

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